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Landscape Revisited

Landscape Revisited explores environments formed in bright color, arrayed composition and untraditional spaces, both terrestrial and imaginary.  With references both overt and oblique helping to nudge the notion of landscape beyond the scope of quotidian perception, this virtual exhibition references a diversity of artists and their subjective expressions on a long hallowed tradition.

Joan Mitchell

Joan Mitchell - Untitled, 1992

Untitled, 1992, painted in the final year of Joan Mitchell’s life, is a striking example of her late work. A synthesis of her artistic influences from Abstract Expressionism to Post-Impressionism, from the period when some of her most lush and moving works were created in her final years...

A vibrant celebration of the physicality of painting, Untitled, 1992, is dynamic in gesture with great variation of texture. On a white background, she applies a striking tangle of prismatic colors, similar to the range found in Monet’s late garden paintings. Dashes of inky black interlace with budding shafts of green that mix and merge with daubs and drips of magenta. The calm of the surrounding white space emphasizes the central composition’s riotous color and dynamic brushwork. Dense layers of paint in the upper and central part of the composition gracefully trickle down to the bottom with delicate drips, like lilacs suspended from a trellis. Her exuberant brushwork dances beside a broad stripe of French blue that stretches the entire length of the canvas.

Kenneth V. Young details

Kenneth V. Young - Untitled, 1968

Kenneth V. Young’s Untitled, 1968 features the colorful floating orb imagery for which he was known. Kaleidoscopic concentrations of brilliant colors effloresce out to the edges of the painting, and produce a stark yet harmonious dichotomy between the unprimed canvas and the colorful acrylic

Frank Stella

Frank Stella - Sunapee I, 1966

Sunapee I, 1966, is the first painting of the Sunapee subseries of the celebrated works, Irregular Polygons, 1965-1966, by Frank Stella.  This extraordinary cycle of paintings was conceived as forty-four works in total, comprised of four color variants of eleven different compositions.  Sunapee is the most complex composition among the Irregular Polygons, featuring four daring shapes that abut or interlock with each other.   

Adolph Gottlieb

Adolph Gottlieb - Extremes, 1966

 

Adolph Gottlieb’s Extremes, 1966 is an emotive and calligraphic work that suggests landscape and evokes the elemental convergence of water, earth, and energy. While maintaining key aspects of previous paintings in the Burst series, Extremes expands and furthers the series aesthetic and conceptual deliverances. This graphical composition combines the artist’s signature disk-like imagery in bright primary colors with a scrawl of gestural black lines, expanding the classic vernacular of his lauded Burst paintings into the large, horizontal format of his earlier Imaginary Landscapes. Both forms radiate with mysterious intensity: while the dense spheres of color appear as elemental and unmoving, the spattered surge of painterly strokes below crackles as if with imminent movement. By setting these disparate energies against one another, Gottlieb creates a powerful visual dichotomy that ceaselessly fluctuates between silence and noise, stillness and motion, calm and angst.

Set to the soundtrack of Chopin’s "Nocturne 21 in C minor," the prints and projection slip in and out of carnage, perhaps a reminder of the long Iranian war with Iraq (1980–88) or, more broadly, what we have complacently come to call "the war-torn Middle East." When I count, there are only you…, Farideh Lashai’s last work, updates for the viewer Goya’s take on the horrors of war and its aftermath. Her remarkable amalgam of prints, animation, and music, just as with the earlier suite of prints, still has the ability to shock us—even as the images remind us of more recent acts of inhumanity. We have seen these corpses and living skeletons too many times. Lashai, like Goya before her, provokes us to question the inhumanity, injustice, and senselessness of war.

 
Farideh Lashai - When I Count, There are Only You...But When I Look, There is Only a Shadow, 2012-2013

 

Robert Rauschenberg

Robert Rauschenberg - Turkey, 1965

Turkey, 1965 is a self-referential investigation into the nature and conventions of image-making, and a late iteration of Robert Rauschenberg’s dynamic 1960s series Silkscreen Paintings. The paintings in this series are among the first works of 20th Century art to both anticipate and give visual form to the post-modernist idea of appropriation and information overload. First created as a way of escaping what Rauschenberg described at the time as "the familiarity of objects and collage”, the Silkscreen Paintings were in part a reaction against, and a painterly extension of his earlier landmark series of "randomly ordered" painting-and-sculpture assemblages, the Combines

James Rosenquist

James Rosenquist - Television or the Cat's Cradle Supports Electronic Picture, 1988-89

Television or the Cat’s Cradle Supports Electronic Picture, 1988-89, by James Rosenquist, is a richly painted canvas with interlaces of figure, flora and celestial imagery that tantalize the viewer with its complexity. The painting captures the vitality of his works of the late 1980s and early 90s expanding on his explorations of themes of light, space, and relativity. 

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Kenneth V. Young (1933-2017)
Untitled, 1968
Acrylic on canvas
54 by 50 inches (137.2 x 127 cm)

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Farideh Lashai (1944-2013)
When I Count, There are Only You...But When I Look, There is Only a Shadow, 2012-2013
Photo-intaglio prints with projection of animated images
Suite of 47 prints 9 by 11.75 inches (23 x 30 cm) each
1 of 2 AP

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Adolph Gottlieb (1903 - 1974)
Extremes, 1966
Oil on canvas
48 by 72 inches (122 x 183 cm)

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Frank Stella (b. 1936)
Sunapee I, 1966
Alkyd and epoxy on shaped canvas
127 1/2 by 120 inches (323.9 x 304.8 cm)

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James Rosenquist (1933-2017)
Television or the Cat's Cradle Supports Electronic Picture, 1988-89
Acrylic on canvas
66 by 240 inches (167.6 x 609.6 cm)

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Robert Rauschenberg (1925- 2008)
Turkey, 1965
Silkscreen on paper collage, baseball, Plexiglas, and metal chains, mounted on canvas, in artist's metal frames in three parts
Part 1: 40 ½ x 36 ½ in. (102.9 x 92.7 cm)
Part 2: 10 ¾ x 13 ½ in. (27.3 x 34.29 cm), plus 45 in. (114.3 cm) chain
Part 3: 12 x 9 ½ in. (30.48 x 24.1 cm), plus 32 in. (81.3 cm) chain
Overall dimensions variable

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Joan Mitchell (1925 - 1992)
Untitled, 1992
Oil on canvas
110 by 78 5/8 inches (279.4 x 200 cm)

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Kenneth V. Young (1933-2017)
Untitled, 1968
Acrylic on canvas
54 by 50 inches (137.2 x 127 cm)

Farideh Lashai (1944-2013)
When I Count, There are Only You...But When I Look, There is Only a Shadow, 2012-2013
Photo-intaglio prints with projection of animated images
Suite of 47 prints 9 by 11.75 inches (23 x 30 cm) each
1 of 2 AP

Adolph Gottlieb (1903 - 1974)
Extremes, 1966
Oil on canvas
48 by 72 inches (122 x 183 cm)

Frank Stella (b. 1936)
Sunapee I, 1966
Alkyd and epoxy on shaped canvas
127 1/2 by 120 inches (323.9 x 304.8 cm)

James Rosenquist (1933-2017)
Television or the Cat's Cradle Supports Electronic Picture, 1988-89
Acrylic on canvas
66 by 240 inches (167.6 x 609.6 cm)

Robert Rauschenberg (1925- 2008)
Turkey, 1965
Silkscreen on paper collage, baseball, Plexiglas, and metal chains, mounted on canvas, in artist's metal frames in three parts
Part 1: 40 ½ x 36 ½ in. (102.9 x 92.7 cm)
Part 2: 10 ¾ x 13 ½ in. (27.3 x 34.29 cm), plus 45 in. (114.3 cm) chain
Part 3: 12 x 9 ½ in. (30.48 x 24.1 cm), plus 32 in. (81.3 cm) chain
Overall dimensions variable

Joan Mitchell (1925 - 1992)
Untitled, 1992
Oil on canvas
110 by 78 5/8 inches (279.4 x 200 cm)